The Art of Darkness

Last-Minute Gift Idea: Vinegar

December 17th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Herb VinegarNo, wait; don’t leave. Hear me out. Vinegar can serve as an awesome gift, filling several different roles.

It’s cheap, easy, and super-fast to make, so it’s a fantastic last-minute hostess gift or stocking stuffer. You can make a whole bunch in very little time, so it’s simple to turn out lots as party favors or small gifts to give out at the office. It can be gussied up in a variety of ways, making it look Very Fancy Indeed and cementing your reputation as a skilled artisan (as opposed to somebody who shoves some herbs in a bottle and pours vinegar on ‘em).

The most common use for vinegar is in cooking, and making flavored vinegar is, indeed, as easy as shoving some herbs in a bottle and pouring vinegar on ‘em. Choose different combinations of herbs to create a whole galaxy of customized flavors. The basic method is to carefully rinse fresh herbs and pat dry, put them in a glass bottle or jar, and cover them with vinegar. (A caveat: Plain white vinegar has a harsh, rather flat taste, so for culinary uses it’s best to use a wine vinegar or cider vinegar.) There’s a good overview of process which goes into more detail here. I particularly like their suggestion of threading peeled garlic on bamboo skewers; there’s a “Vlad the Impaler” blend just waiting to happen.

The real fun in flavored vinegar is choosing the flavors, and if you google “how to make flavored vinegars” you will get a truly overwhelming number of suggestions. Some good basic combinations are:
Oregano, Rosemary, and Marjoram
Chili, Cilantro, and Garlic
Fennel, Orange Peel, and Star Anise
Raspberry and Thyme
Shallot, Tarragon, and Lemon Peel

The herbs should steep in the vinegar for at least 24 hours before being used, with the flavors growing stronger over time. However, if this is a make-something-before-you-run-out-the-door gift, warm the vinegar to a bare simmer (don’t boil) before pouring it over the herbs. That’ll give the infusion a little head-start.

But wait, there’s more! Vinegar has been much touted as a natural all-purpose cleaner, so step up your gift-giving game with scented cleaning vinegar. The 5% concentration sold in grocery stores is fine, but there are higher concentrations (including one that’s a whopping 20%) if you prefer; look for them in grocery-store cleaning aisles, hardware stores, or online.

The infusion method is pretty much the same as for culinary vinegar, but you’ll want to choose pleasant scents and don’t have to worry about the taste. Some ideas:
Citrus peels (orange, lemon, lime, grapefruit), one type or in combination
Strong-smelling herbs like sage, lavender, mint, or rosemary
Whole spices like cloves, cinnamon sticks, or allspice
Vanilla beans: Scrape the seeds out of the bean for use in cooking, and use the pod to scent vinegar
Fragrant rose petals
A few drops of essential oil

Cleaning vinegar is great for degreasing things like range hoods, brightening mirrors and windows, disinfecting surfaces, freshening laundry, and ironing. (It shouldn’t be used on marble surfaces or hardwood floors, since it can damage them.)

One final use for scented vinegar is as “Monster Spray.” To help ward off monsters, natch. Use calming scents such as lavender and put it in a little spray bottle (there are even labels you can use). Spritz a little around a child’s room to banish the thing under the bed, or to help them go back to sleep after a nightmare. The vinegar makes it smell like it means business, so you know it’s working.

Easy! Cheap! If you’re strapped for a fast holiday gift, help is as close as your grocery store.

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 2 Comments »

Great Gift: Bath Salts

November 18th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Poison Ivy Bath SaltsI am a big fan of bath salts as a gift idea, and here’s why:
1) They’re easy to make
2) They’re inexpensive to make
3) You can make loads of them in a single afternoon
4) They look like they took way more time, money, and effort than 1-3 would suggest

Despite how simple and cheap they are, they’re a gift you can be proud of giving: It’s fun to create something that looks like it came from a high-end spa, and recipients are generally pretty enthusiastic. Some interesting containers, a clever label, and a few simple ingredients are all you need for a splendid last-minute hostess gift, party favor, or stocking stuffer.

There are a zillion recipes for bath salts, some of them involving an astonishing number of ingredients, but all you really need is Epsom Salt. It’s the basis for most bath salts, and I suppose if you were in a real hurry you could just bung some into a jar and call it a gift. However, a few additional ingredients make things a lot nicer: Salt (of the sodium chloride variety) is better at absorbing fragrance and coloring than Epsom Salt, and different-sized grains can be used to vary the texture of the finished product. Sea salts add trace minerals and natural color. Even table salt can be used, although be aware that some people’s skin may be sensitive to the added iodine and/or anti-clumping agents. Baking soda acts as a skin softener and water conditioner. All of those can be found at your local grocery store or, if you plan to make a large quantity, can be ordered online from soap- and skincare suppliers (I like From Nature With Love). The other ingredients you might want are skin-safe fragrance oils, colorings, and botanicals (like dried flowers or herbs).

An easy recipe with a spooky twist is this Poison Ivy Bath Salts from Paging Supermom: Dried mint provides wicked-looking green flecks, and they even have a downloadable label if you don’t want to design your own. These Blood Orange salts are also attractive, and even includes instructions for a little witch-hat bottle topper. These Pumpkin Spice Bath Salts are just Epsom Salt with fragrance and coloring.

If you want to get a little more ambitious, you can layer different colors of salts in a clear container: These single-serving Candy Corn Bath Treats are adorable. You could just use three colors of bath salts, but if you want to make it fizzy as the recipe suggests, that’s easy too. (Citric acid is available from soapmaking suppliers, but it’s also used for canning fruit and can be found at some grocery stores.) For another layering idea, the fragrances and colors suggested in this Halloween Foaming Bath Salts recipe sound nice (it’s based off of the same site’s Foaming Fruity Layers recipe, which has some helpful pictures); the “foaming” part is optional if you don’t want to bother with Sodium Lauryl Sulfoacetate.

Once you’ve got your salts, you can choose a suitable container. You can find all kinds of interesting bottles and jars at craft stores or online; if you’re giving just a few gifts you might select a container that can be re-used later: A pretty salt cellar or sugar jar, for example (or really go nuts with a themed sugar shaker). If you’re making a large quantity of bath salts as gifts, you can find a variety of containers at wholesale specialty suppliers like SKS.

You can also get creative with labels and decoration: This packaging for Halloween Bath Salts is attractive and easy, and I love this set of Halloween Party Favors, each with a different label and scent.

If you want to gift a whole set of differently-scented bath salts, take a leaf from the seasoning salts sold by Hoxton Street Monster Supplies (whom I’ve covered previously): Their Tears in a Bottle series boasts:

Salt Made From Tears combines centuries-old craft with the freshest human tears which are gently boiled, released into shallow crystallisation tanks, then harvested by hand and finally rinsed in brine. Experience the full range of these flavours in this exclusive collection.

~ Salt Made From Tears of Anger
~ Salt Made From Tears Shed While Chopping Onions
~ Salt Made From Tears Shed While Sneezing
~ Salt Made From Tears of Laughter
~ Salt Made From Tears of Sorrow

Each variety has its own description, which could be easily modified for scents rather than flavors: “This delectable salt, made from tears of abject sorrow, is collected only at moments of complete misery. With its delicate lavender flavour, it’s the perfect seasoning for limbs and organs.” “This robust salt is made from tears that sprang forth during explosions of anger. With a rich and smokey flavour, it can help to induce fit of uncontrolled rage, as normally experienced only by Ogres and Trolls.” and so on.

Blood Bath SaltsFinally, check out this super-awesome “Blood Bath Salts” canister which I can’t seem to find out much about other than that they were some sort of limited-edition Halloween home decor item and are widely sought after. (Click to embiggen.) A reasonable facsimile might be created by hot-gluing a novelty plastic skull to a canister lid and then spray-painting it with metallic paint. A similar label could be created in the graphics program of your choice and either glued on or (if you’re particularly ambitious) used as a template for stenciling. Color bath salts red and add some dried rose petals or hibiscus flowers for additional color, and you’ll have an extremely cool bathroom accessory.

Bonus link: For a Christmas rather than a Halloween gift, The Idea Room has a neat set of Myrrh Bath Salts and Frankincense Sugar Scrub. (The “gold” was represented by chocolate gold coins, but you could substitute a little bottle of Goldschläger.)

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 3 Comments »

Life-Size Ghost Decorations

October 8th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Human Ghost DisplayI found this Human Ghost Display by Grandin Road via Scary Jane, who was righteously outraged that: 1) Standing a mere 5 feet tall, they’re only suitable for scaring very short people, and 2) Despite all of the photos implying that they’re sold as a group of 3, they’re actually sold individually…for $129. Oh my stars and garters.

A foam wig head, bolt of cheesecloth, and some glue will run you about $15. You could make a whole army of these for less than a single pre-made one. The method could hardly be simpler: Tie long strips of cheesecloth around the neck of the dummy head, layering them to make the body. Paint white glue–liquid starch would probably work too–all over the dummy head, then press another big piece of cheesecloth into the glue; make sure the piece that covers the head is long enough to also cover the neck and hide the attachment point of the cheesecloth strips. Let dry. Boom. Done.

These would be really lightweight, so you could simply hang them from the ceiling using invisible monofilament fishing line. You could also drape them over hat racks, floor lamps, or other tall skinny furniture to loom over your guests.

If you want transparent ghosts instead, you can make good-looking ones using packing tape. The basic method involves wrapping transparent packing tape and/or plastic wrap around a human form (a wig head and dressmaker’s dummy if you have them, a willing assistant if you don’t), carefully cutting a slit up the back to release the mold/person, then taping back over the cut. With several layers of tape the resulting ghost is sturdy enough to stand on its own, and is also light enough to hang just about anywhere.

Googling “packing tape ghost” will turn up loads of tutorials; there are some good ones at The Crafty Geek, Bandit, John Rozum, and Tape Sculpture (which also has a gallery of examples). There are also a couple of Pinterest posts (with no instructions) for visual inspiration: I like these spooky ladies in dresses floating around a tree, and this great-looking ghost made from a combination of packing tape and cheesecloth.

Somewhat related is this Instructable for Ghost Shoes, which includes solar-powered lights so they glow at night. Their method involves hacking cheap solar-powered garden lights for components; you could also save yourself a couple of steps and just buy the solar circuit and LED (in whatever color you like) from someplace like Evil Mad Scientist (who also has a tutorial for making simple solar circuits).

A fun yard decoration would be to make individual packing-tape ghosts of each family member (and the pets, if they’ll hold still [they probably won’t hold still]) and then pose them in a tableau. Whatever you do, I bet it’ll be cheaper than $129.

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 3 Comments »

DIY Dragon Eggs

September 16th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Dragon EggsFrom an evolutionary standpoint, I’ve always been puzzled by the idea of scaled eggs: Not only would the egg-layer have to have a teflon cloaca to extrude them without damage, the scales would be a hospitable environment for microorganisms.

On the other hand, scaled eggs look badass and since the thing that’s supposed to be hatching out of them is pretty evolutionarily improbable anyway I should probably find something else to worry about.

Anyway. Scaled eggs. Imgur member “pellantana” has put together a great tutorial for making good-looking dragon eggs by covering a styrofoam egg form with thumbtacks. The basic idea could hardly be easier, although I might suggest a couple of minor changes:

1) The styrofoam peeks through a bit at the end of the egg where the final thumbtacks are placed. It might be a good idea to either paint the egg black (which can be tough–styrofoam is hard to paint and some types of paint will eat it away) or slip a piece of black nylon stocking over the egg before starting in on the thumbtacks; the tacks will hold the stocking in place. I suppose you could also cover the end of the egg with thin tissue paper; brush it with a little watered-down white glue to form it to the shape of the egg and help hold it steady.

2) All of the thumbtacks–625 of ‘em–were hand-painted. That’s…a lot of thumbtacks to hand-paint. Since the tutorial recommends sticking them in the top of a pizza box to hold them steady anyway, it seems reasonable to go one further step and spray-paint them (this is mentioned briefly as an option at the very bottom, but the artist eschews it in favor of the hand-painted look). There are lots of neat metallic and faux-finish spray paints available, including “glitter spray” and marbleized varieties. There’s even a webbing spray; hitting the finished egg lightly with that might be interesting.

The finished egg could be displayed nestled in cotton wool in a wooden box so it resembles a specimen collected on expedition. It would also look nice placed on a pedestal candleholder.

It’d be fun to make one of these and hide it before an Easter egg hunt.

Bonus links: There’s a neat alternate method for making dragon eggs using hot glue. Also check out this lovely jeweled paperweight.

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 3 Comments »

Lovecraft Storage Box

August 12th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Lovecraft BoxThe fabulous xJane, arbiter of all things stationery-related, recently pointed me to this Facebook post about a DIY Lovecraft-themed stationery storage box. It was made by a crafter named Al Rio; for the Facebook-impaired, I’m copying the photo (click to embiggen) and her comment here:

Typhoon season here in my country. By candle light in this stormy weather, the things we can make and do. How about a hand-made Lovecraftian box to store your favorite pens?

Materials: lots of craft paper, vinyl stickers, thermoplastic adhesive, foam board, sintra board, acrylic paints, costume prop accessories

xJane noted that it looked pretty DIY-able, and I agree. Wooden boxes of various sizes are widely available at craft stores and online; and you could even cheat and get an inexpensive decorative box from an import store that already looks exotic and spooky.

A design of your choice can be applied pretty easily with a stencil. Rio’s box uses the Necronomicon Gate, but you could do an Elder Sign, a simple Cthulhu, or google “Lovecraft stencil” for other examples. (That Cthulhu link, incidentally, also includes simple instructions for making your own stencil in case you aren’t sure how to proceed.)

If you want to use the box to store stationery supplies, check out this tutorial for repurposing an antique box; it includes instructions on lining the interior with decorative paper, and the final step includes making a DIY pen-and-pencil holder. Also take a look at Cigar Box Pen Storage for lots of additional inspiration.

The rest of the decoration can be as you desire: Leftover supplies from other craft projects, orphaned earrings, paint, and anything else which will lend an eldritch vibe. I like the “treasured reliquary” look of this box, but you could go in the opposite direction and distress it to look like something that had been buried in an ancient tomb and only recently unearthed.

Obviously, the same idea has uses beyond stationery storage. Depending upon the size of the box, you could use it for anything from holding jewelry to hiding your wireless router (be sure it’s adequately ventilated). Little individual treasure boxes would be interesting gifts for a bridal party. You could also make a set of varying sizes as office desk accessories; it’s much more fun to store paperclips in an artifact from the Mountains of Madness than a boring plastic cube.

(Thanks, xJane!)

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 2 Comments »

FeeJee Mermaid Build

July 31st, 2014 by Cobwebs

FeeJee MermaidI love a good sideshow gaff, and the Pyewackett and Pecke site has posted a rare treat: Build notes and photos for a great-looking FeeJee Mermaid prop. Artist Dan Baines has a five-part series of posts detailing the prop: Part 1, Part 2, Part 3, Part 4, Part 5.

(Incidentally, if Baines’ name sounds familiar, it’s because he was the artist responsible for the great mummified fairy hoax in 2007.)

Some of his techniques and materials are probably out of range of the average home DIY-er: The mermaid’s claws, for instance, are made from 3D-printed bird feet, and Baines made a custom silicon-rubber texturizer to create the impression of scales. However, there are other, less esoteric, ways to achieve similar effects: Replica animal claws are available at places like The Evolution Store, you can use claw-looking things like dentalium shells, or you can simply mold the things individually out of polymer clay. Instead of clawed fingers, it might be interesting to give the mermaid webbed hands instead; in that case, the model duck feet used for taxidermy would look great.

The scaly texture on the tail could be created by lightly pressing the head of a large nail into the wet covering on the skin in an overlapping pattern. Although not flexible the way a silicon mold would be, the “coarse” section of a cheese grater might also work. (There are also dog treats made of real dried fish skin; I’m curious as to whether they’d have sufficient depth to be used as a mold.)

For the front half of the mermaid Baines used an 18″ medical skeleton model and a resin cast of a human infant skull. He unfortunately doesn’t specify where he got either; the Skeleton Store has a replica of a full fetal skeleton, but it’s a tad pricey. Their Frugal Fernando seems about the right size for the ribs and arms, and instead of a fetal skull a replica monkey skull might be a cheaper option; after all, the original taxidermied FeeJee Mermaids were made from the front half of a monkey attached to the back half of a fish.

This would be a fantastic display piece, and would look great as part of a cabinet of curiosities. The next time you vacation at the beach, be sure to dig around souvenir shops for dried seaweed and similar oceany stuff which could be used either as detailing on the body (feathery kelp might make interesting fins) or to add “carnival exhibit” interest to the display stand.

Bonus link: The Propnomicon site has a nice post mortem discussing this build, with further suggestions for materials and techniques more suited to the amateur builder.

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 2 Comments »

DIY Casket Grill and Cooler

July 29th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Casket Grill

Oh. Wow.

A while back I found a photo of a barbecue grill housed in a casket and was dismayed because there were no other photos or information about it. Fabulous commenter Fiend4Halloween just pointed me to a version that’s not only much nicer, it also includes build instructions. Check out this awesomeness.

The creator is lime3D, a self-described “Inventor for Hire,” who built the grill for tailgating parties with the Nightmare Cruisers Hearse Club. The modified casket and accessories are fairly heavy, so part of the project involved refurbishing a trailer to tow the grill behind his hearse. I would enjoy seeing that driving down the road.

The casket mod is really well-done, with half of the interior housing the grill and the other half an insulated cooler. There’s storage space between the two for tools and utensils, and the storage lid doubles as a cutting board. He even installed a radio in the exterior.

Now, obviously, this is a project that requires some fairly advanced skills and tools, so it’s beyond the scope of a lot of us DIY types. However, if you’ve got the necessary experience (or can obtain the services of a welder and/or carpenter), this would be an amazing build opportunity. If you aren’t the tailgating type, mount it on a stand in your yard.

The maker answers some additional questions in the comments section, such as where to obtain a casket. U.S. law makes it fairly easy to purchase them from a third-party source; Wal-Mart sells them, as does Amazon. If those options aren’t available to you (or are too expensive), check with local funeral homes for damaged products. You’re going to rip out the whole interior anyway, and an exterior dent or two shouldn’t matter much. If you don’t want to bother with the cooler half of the project, a child-size or pet casket (why they make steel caskets for pets is another question entirely) should be significantly cheaper and could house just the grill.

(Thanks, Fiend4Halloween!)

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 3 Comments »

Design Your Middle-Earth Heraldic Device

June 19th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Herald of LuthienAs someone whose relationship with Tolkien tends to be on the casual side* it’s easy to forget just how rich and detailed his mythology and history actually are. Then I discover that not only did Tolkien create heraldic devices for many of his characters, he even laid out the rules (formulated by “the Elves”) for designing new ones.

The Council of Elrond discusses how to design a woman’s device, with the main points being:

  • It must be circular
  • The background is generally black
  • It usually contains a flower which has special significance to the bearer
  • There can be a mark which identifies the bearer’s family (such as a detail from the family coat of arms)
  • The number of points touching the edge of the field relates to the bearer’s rank

The Tolkiensällskapet Forodrim site has a detailed article on Middle-Earth emblems and heraldry; the rules for men don’t seem to be quite as cut-and-dried as for women, other than that it should be lozenge-shaped and you need to pay attention to the number of points touching the edge. There are additional examples at the Tolkien Gateway wiki, and you can also look at sites devoted to “real” heraldry for ideas on color choices, placement of charges, and so on.

If you can draw or have access to a computer graphics program, this would be an interesting way to create your own unique “brand.” Once you have a design you like, it could be used as a pattern for all sorts of craft projects: Quilts, wall hangings, cross-stitch, personalized stationery, painted fabric, and lots more. (And, obviously, if you’re into LOTR cosplay, embroider the design on a cloak or paint it on your shield.)

Couple of bonus links from the Council of Elrond site: Planning the Middle-earth Wedding and Gardens of Middle-earth, which has a bunch of theme garden ideas (including one representing Mordor).


*Saruman and Sauron should have had less-similar names. The Two Towers could have been replaced with a pamphlet saying, “They rode and rode and rode and rode….” The Silmarillion is a loooooong way across. That sort of casual.

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 2 Comments »

Unicorn Barf

June 11th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Unicorn BarfI am 100% on board with this idea, although possibly not with the execution.

Following in the footsteps of the splendid unicorn poop cookies comes unicorn barf marshmallow treats. Instructables user Danger is my middle name discovered that the brightly-colored marshmallows used in breakfast cereals like Lucky Charms can be purchased in bulk, and used them to make what are essentially Rice Krispie treats without the Rice Krispies: The crunchy marshmallows are bound together with regular melted marshmallows to make one big wad of (admittedly festive-looking) marshmallow…stuff.

That’s where I take issue with the execution, since they’ve got to be so overwhelmingly sweet they make my teeth ache just thinking about it.

Fortunately, I think there might be a couple of other ways to achieve the same general idea which are still sweet, but not quite “mainlining corn syrup” sweet.

When I first glanced at the photos in the instructions, I thought that they were regular Rice Krispie treats, but with miniature colored marshmallows being used in place of regular white marshmallows as the binding agent. You’d have to be careful to not fully melt the marshmallows, since then they’d just homogenize into a sort of grey goo, but if you dumped in the puffed rice just as they were getting stringy, you ought to wind up with swirled colors.

The other, easier, way would be to use regular marshmallows and replace the Rice Krispies with colored cereal like Fruity Pebbles or Trix.* That would get you the same technicolor contents without quite as much sugar.

As a last resort, I guess you could also make regular Rice Krispie treats and then swirl in a few dabs of gel food coloring to get unevenly-colored patches. The mixture tends to be stiff and hard to work with, though, so I’m not dead sure how that would work out.

Rather than pouring the result into a pan and then cutting it into squares when cool, I’d suggest dropping them in individual mounds on parchment paper so they look a little more barf-like. You might also use slightly less cereal than the recipe calls for so the result is a little gooier.

However you do it, these would be a fun addition to a party buffet, especially if paired with the poop cookies. One or two pieces in cellophane bags would be fun party favors, and you could layer a bunch in a tin as a gift. Who wouldn’t want to receive a package of magical unicorn barf?


*Overseas readers, sorry about the US-centric cereal brands. If you don’t have these specific varieties, hopefully you can find something similar. (I just found out that Rice Krispies are called Rice Bubbles in Australia, so that’s neat.)

Posted in Doom It Yourself | 3 Comments »

Easy, Spooky Cake Decorating

May 29th, 2014 by Cobwebs

Monster Eye CakeI am a sucker for elaborately-decorated cakes. Unfortunately, I am stuck simply admiring them rather than making them because my cake-decorating skills are less “Julia Child” and more “uncoordinated three-year-old.” If you’re in the same frosting-smeared boat as I am, you’ll appreciate this monster eye cake from Carrie at The Cake Blog, which somehow manages to be ultra-simple and surprisingly sophisticated.

It really is simple, in the sense that even an uncoordinated three-year-old can help with the decoration: Pry apart some creme-filled cookies (such as Oreos), add M&Ms or other round candies as pupils, and stick ‘em to a plain iced cake. Brilliant!

She uses both regular-size and mini Oreos to add a little variation to the design. You could vary things even further by using different types of round sandwich cookies, changing the color of the candy pupils, or drawing little bloodshot lines with red food coloring and a toothpick. In the U.S., at least, Oreo cookies are also available with different colors of filling: A couple, such as mint (green) and lemon (yellow) appear to be available year-’round; there are also seasonal ones like bright orange for Halloween and red for Christmas, which could be purchased and frozen for later use. Some green Oreo eyes with red M&M pupils would look particularly monstrous. (A pair of mini-cookie eyes would also be cute cupcake toppers.)

Nearly as easy and even more elegant is her marshmallow cobweb cake, in which strings of melted marshmallow stand in for spiderwebs. A simple fondant spider–or even a novelty plastic one, if you’re in a hurry–completes the design.

Finally, check out these cupcake liner witch hats which make striking cupcake toppers and could hardly be simpler to make.

Be sure to take a look at the rest of the site’s DIY section, too; there are loads of other designs which take a teeny bit more work but are still within the realm of possibility: Fat little mummies, some “love bugs” which could certainly pass as standard-issue fuzzy monsters without the valentine antennae, and an airbrush-look splatter cake which could be given a blood-spattered makeover by substituting red food coloring for black.

Then, if you want to bring yourself back down to earth, browse through the cake section for designs like the vintage goth cake which we mere mortals can only gaze upon in wonder. Yowza.

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